Three Unhelpful Claims on the Protection of Nature and Landscape

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_ARTICLE_ by Kris van Koppen
In this somewhat provocative essay for TOPOS, I will dispute three often-heard claims in debates on nature and landscape planning. While plausible at first sight, none of these claims is valid. Moreover, none of them is helpful in protecting and improving our natural environment. In this essay, I will explain why I think so, and argue for forms of nature and landscape planning in which government, citizens, and experts all play significant roles. I will take the Netherlands as example, but the arguments have a wider relevance.

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The Ems Full Hybrid

Het kribbenlandschap van het Eems estuarium

_GRADUATION WORK_ by Remco van der Togt and Jonas Papenborg
‘The Ems Full Hybrid’ is a growing strategy that, aided by discarded oil platforms and new tidal polders, offers a solution to the economic and ecological problems of the Ems estuary. Introducing these polders and platforms restores the balance in the natural system and holds out new economic opportunities for the depopulating region.

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Extensive portrait of a landscape

_BOOK REVIEW_ by Abel Coenen
The 2012 book A Photographic Portrait of a Landscape emphasizes on the meaning of the terms landscape and land ownership. Despite its ambitious title it presents an easily readable collection of texts and images, showing the different aspects of Dutch landscape. By both a photo study on the Frisian village Wjelsryp and an extensive essay this philosophical topic is researched thoroughly. A must-read for those who work with landscapes.

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Aesthetic Engagement with Built Landscape

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_ARTICLE_ by Yuriko Saito
Everyday aesthetics, the subject of my recent work, aims to illuminate those aspects of our lives that are normally not the focus of aesthetic attention. Objects of daily use and the environment we inhabit are commonly regarded as a background against which various events and activities take place. As such, they are taken for granted and generally do not give rise to a memorable experience, unless their familiarity is disrupted.

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